#Bee-Loved Flower People

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Bergamot. Wellington 2015

In the spring, I  gave bee-loved seedlings (and tomato and courgette seedlings) only to people I love. By chance really. People in my extended ‘family’ who help me flourish, so I see them regularly. Because they warm my heart, with their laughter and talk and generosity. (Some of them passed on the seedlings to people I don’t know.)

As the plants mature, I’m learning that these beautiful  Bee-Loved Flower People  (the 1960s return, in a new form!) also help the plants flourish, strongly. And differently from those that stayed here, in my garden and on the public zigzag. I expected that this would happen with the seedlings I gave my chi gong teacher, but it seems to be happening with all the plants.

Remember that 14 1/2 inch Florence ribbed courgette/marrow the other day, from up the coast in Kapiti?  That courgette photo from out at Lower Hutt? And now there’s more news, via Twitter, from a household  that’s a twenty minute stroll away.

Last night, in a series of tweets, I got the  picture above, of the first bergamot seedling to flower, confirming that the plant is a bergamot. Then these tomato pics. Like me, this Bee-Loved Flower Person has lost the plant labels.

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Gardener’s Delight?

‘I think that’s the Gardener’s Delights,’  came the tweet. ‘Not sure about these wrinkly ones. I don’t think that’s the Black From Tula but I don’t remember what the third breed was you gave us!’ (Cherokee Purple.)

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Cherokee Purple?

And: ‘I think this might be a B(lack) F(rom) T(ula)’.

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Black From Tula?

‘Mine are so SMALL still,’ I tweeted back.

The response: ‘I may have cheated as they’re planted straight into potting mix bags. We are quite sheltered though which probably helps?’

My response just flew onto the screen: ‘There’s no ‘cheating’ in that. Shelter, yr sun, yr good chi & green fingers. All that laughter–‘

I’m so excited by all this. Surprised and delighted that these Bee-Loved Flower People’s experiences with their plants extend and enhance my understanding of the plants that stayed here.

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